Thursday, April 24, 2014

ECU Research on Lowrance/BioBase Effectiveness for Seagrass Mapping

Read about exciting new research by Dr. Joe Luczkovich's lab at East Carolina University demonstrating rapid, precise and cost-effective acoustic techniques for mapping seagrass habitats in North Carolina USA's Coastal Estuaries.  Dr. Luczkovich and undergraduate research assistant Audrey Pleva talk about the very high accuracy of Lowrance HDS and BioBase for seagrass in shallow areas of Jarrett Bay, Blount's Bay, and Currituck Sound compared with underwater videography

Below is the abstract from: Audrey Pleva and Joseph Luczkovich.  2013. Effects of salinity on submerged aquatic vegetation’s growth and abundance in North Carolina and assessment of a SONAR’s accuracy to measure vegetation. Unpublished report, Department of Biology,  Institute for Coastal Science and Policy, East Carolina University, Greenville, NC 27858.  Contact Dr. Luczkovich if you have questions or would like a copy of the report.  Contact Navico to get updated (cheaper) pricing from what is cited in the report and to get you started assessing seagrass habitats with Lowrance/Simrad and BioBase!

ABSTRACT
 Submerged aquatic vegetation (SAV) is one of the most important estuarine habitats supporting commercially and recreationally important fishes and invertebrates, providing species food and shelter from predation. Salinity levels, an important factor in SAV growth and survival, are rising in North Carolina due to sea level rise bringing salty water from the Atlantic Ocean into NC, posing a threat to freshwater species. SAV species adapted to a certain salinity level are stressed by long and short term changes in salinity, resulting in patchy or smaller beds. In this project, a recently developed survey technique based on a combined video and echosounder system was used to measure the SAV % cover at three sites, each with different long-term and short-term salinity levels. Our hypothesis was that large short-term changes in salinity would be a stressor for SAV, and that as the range in salinity and the average long-term salinity increased, SAV % cover would decrease. We measured changes in water quality including salinity, temperature, and dissolved oxygen, and SAV cover using boat-based SONAR techniques at Jarrett Bay (JBS), Blount’s Bay (BLB), and Currituck Sound (CTS) in North Carolina during the beginning of the growth season where salinity is a very important growth factor. SONAR data were collected along 30 transects at 10-m intervals across the study area at JBS and BLB, but 60 transects at 25-m intervals at CTS. The accuracy of the SONAR technique was assessed using underwater video at 100 randomly selected points along transects at each site. Accuracy was very high (87.8 %) and relatively equal between all three sites. The salinities and % cover were highly variable among sites, in both the short- and long-term measurements, allowing for an analysis of the relationship between SAV and salinity. Overall mean long-term salinity was negatively correlated (r = -0.7) with SAV percent cover. Short-term salinity increases may cause declines in SAV cover, as freshwater species are displaced by salinity-tolerant SAV species.

Example image of seagrass abundance (% of water column with vegetation) in Currituck Sound, North Carolina.  200 khz Sonar image from Lowrance HDS (right) is coupled and synced with kriging interpolated map of vegetation abundance (left).  Areas of red are where vegetation is growing to or near the surface.  Areas of blue are bare.  Green and yellow is lower lying vegetation.  Datasets are summarized in BioBase with several analytic tools, but spatial data can also be exported for analysis in any third party GIS or statistical analysis platform.
See an online pdf of a presentation recently given by Dr. Luczkovich describing some of these results.

Friday, April 18, 2014

Innovations in Storm Pond Assessment and Tracking: Minnesota Demo

Be prepared for new Municipal Separate Storm Sewer System (MS4) rules with cost-effective solutions for inventorying the compliance of all of your stormwater basins.

When: Friday May 2nd, 2014

Where: A stormwater pond site in Roseville, MN (contact Ray Valley for details)

Attendees will learn about innovations to help them rapidly:
  • COLLECTPlatypus LLC will demonstrate bottom depth and composition data collection with Lowrance depth sounders and chartplotters on autonomous boats on a Roseville, MN Stormwater Basin.
  • PROCESS – Navico, Inc., makers of Lowrance and BioBase will demonstrate automated data processing and GIS map creation of collected bathymetric data.
  • TRACK – Flatrock Geographics, Makers of PondTrack (*new*) and MapFeeder will demonstrate cloud-based inventory and data management tools.

Reps from all companies will discuss individual and bundling pricing options. Please contact Ray Valley (651-303-5265 ray.valley@navico.com) to reserve a space. Registration is free but space is limited!